Tag Archives: Fourth Amendment

The “Exigent Circumstances” Exception to the Warrant Requirement in DC

The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution provides that:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

The requirement that police have a warrant to enter a person’s house without permission is one of our most basic freedoms. One exception to the warrant requirement is where so-called “exigent circumstances” require police to enter a residence without a warrant. In such cases, there is a “heavy burden on the police to show that there was a need that could not brook the delay incident to obtaining a warrant.”[1] The D.C. Court of Appeals has adopted a seven-factor test to determine when a warrantless entry and search of a residence will be allowed under this exception: Continue reading